Military History Digest #138

Table of Contents

1. The Battle of the North Atlantic: Allied Convoys by Charles McCain at World War II History
2. Discovering Private Walker: Using New Technologies to Catalogue Old Relics by Dianne Rutherford at Australian War Memorial
3. Fred Anderson and Andrew Cayton: the Dominion of War by Pritzker Military Library at Pritzker Military Library Podcasts
4. Inspired by the Hero of the “Planter” by noreply@blogger.com (Ron Coddington) at Faces of War
5. Edward Thomas and Arras, at the Iwm by George Simmers at Great War Fiction
6. Review: a Guide to the Battles of the American Revolution by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns
7. 8-Inch Parrott Rifles – Army Coast/River Defense Use by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns
8. Privateers &Amp; Pirates: Blackbeard Killed by n/a at About.com Military History
9. Eyewitness Account: Lincoln at Gettysburg by noreply@blogger.com (Ron Coddington) at Faces of War
10. J. Weikert (Althoff) Farm Lane by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)
11. Custer Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)
12. Slyder Lane by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)
13. Spangler Farm Lane by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)
14. Benner’s Hill Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)
15. Ayres Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)
16. Granite Schoolhouse Lane by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)
17. United States Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)
18. Neill Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)
19. North Confederate Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)
20. Pleasonton Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)
21. Sickles Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)
22. Bushman Farm Lane by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)
23. Sykes Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)
24. Cross, Brooke, and Detrobriand Avenues by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)
25. East Confederate Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)
26. Buford Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)
27. Humphreys Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)
28. Slocum Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)
29. West Confederate Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)
30. Crawford Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)
31. South Confederate Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)
32. Reynolds Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)
33. Hancock Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)
34. Thursday, 21 November 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded
35. Guest Post: Recommission Olympia by Lcdr Claude Berube, Usnr by admin at Other Military History Stuff

Contents

1. The Battle of the North Atlantic: Allied Convoys by Charles McCain at World War II History

There are many battles in World War Two which historians
claim to be the “most important battle of the war.” But the
Battle of the North Atlantic really was the most important
battle of the war. Had we lost, then Great Britain would have
been forced to surrender. U-Boats, Allied escorts ships, and
aircraft from both sides played the major role in this battle
and beginning with this post I am going to post once or twice
a week on the Battle of the North Atlantic. I can do this for
years probably because the Battle lasted all of…

2. Discovering Private Walker: Using New Technologies to Catalogue Old Relics by Dianne Rutherford at Australian War Memorial

Mess tin found at Lone Pine, Gallipoli in 1919
RELAWM07799.004 There is a mess tin on display in the
Gallipoli gallery that is rusted and full of holes. It was
found over 90 years ago scattered with dozens of other pieces
of kit around the Lone Pine position at Gallipoli in January
1919 by staff from the […]

3. Fred Anderson and Andrew Cayton: the Dominion of War by Pritzker Military Library at Pritzker Military Library Podcasts

Authors Fred Anderson and Andrew Cayton visit the Library to
discuss their book: The Dominion of War: Empire and Liberty
in North America 1500 – 2000. Originally aired 01/12/05.

4. Inspired by the Hero of the “Planter” by noreply@blogger.com (Ron Coddington) at Faces of War

The story of Robert Smalls’ 1862 capture of the Confederate
steamer Planter from Charleston Harbor and delivery of the
vessel, loaded with cannon, to safety under the protection of
the Union blockading fleet is well known. The escaped slave
(pictured here in an engraving from Harper’s Weekly) from
Beaufort, South Carolina, became an instant celebrity across
the North. Like many events of the war, it inspired poetry,
including this piece that appeared in the Boston Transcript.
The poem appeared a few months after the event. At the time,
Robert’s last name was spelled Smalls and Small. In this
instance, the…

5. Edward Thomas and Arras, at the Iwm by George Simmers at Great War Fiction

I spent a good afternoon yesterday at the Imperial War
Museum, attending an event organised jointly by the Edward
Thomas Fellowship and the War Poets Association. Thomas met
his death at the Battle of Arras, of course, and the two
speakers yesterday afternoon came at that subject from
interestingly different directions. First Sir Martin Gilbert
gave a lucid account of the background of the battle, and its
miserable course. The British only fought there because
Nivelle insisted that the French attack on the Aisne would be
decisive, if a British attack diverted troops and covered the
French flank. It was…

6. Review: a Guide to the Battles of the American Revolution by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns

A Guide to the Battles of the American Revolution, by
Theodore P. Savas and J. David Dameron (New York: Savis
Beatie, 2010. Paperback, 345 pages main text, 60 pages of
preface and reference, 7 page appendix, 8 page index. $19.95.
… Continue reading →…

7. 8-Inch Parrott Rifles – Army Coast/River Defense Use by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns

Having looked at the Navy’s use of 8-inch Parrotts, it is
time I turned to the Army’s use of the type. Like the Navy,
the Army purchased these heavy Parrott rifles with
Confederate ironclads and fortifications in mind. Unlike the
… Continue reading →…

8. Privateers &Amp; Pirates: Blackbeard Killed by n/a at About.com Military History

November 22, 1718 – The pirate Blackbeard (right) is killed
by the Royal Navy. One of the most feared pirates of all
time, Edward Teach was active in the waters of the Caribbean
and North America between 1716 and 1718. A successful pirate
leader, he commanded from his ship Queen Anne’s Revenge until
its loss at Beaufort Inlet in 1718. Known for his blockade of
Charleston, SC in mid-1718, he accepted a royal pardon a
short time later. Unable to stay retired, he quickly returned
to piracy. These actions led the Governor of Virginia,
Alexander Spotswood, to dispatch an expedition…

9. Eyewitness Account: Lincoln at Gettysburg by noreply@blogger.com (Ron Coddington) at Faces of War

Journalist, author, and Librarian of the U.S. Congress John
Russell Young (1840-1899) witnessed the dedication of the
Soldiers’ National Cemetery at Gettysburg on Nov. 19, 1863.
Young (pictured here) covered the event as a reporter for the
Philadelphia Press. His recollection of the appearance and
speech of President Abraham Lincoln highlights the contrast
between what happened in the moment and how we remember it
today, a couple days shy of the 147th anniversary:The
celebration at Gettysburg was on Cemetery Hill. I was sent
there to report for the Press. I sat behind Mr. Lincoln. Mr.
Everett delivered the oration…

10. J. Weikert (Althoff) Farm Lane by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)

Road Name: J. Weikert (Althoff) Farm Lane Named For: The
local farmer who owned the lane. Location: The Valley of
Death. Built: 1841. Altered: 1870. Designer: Unknown.
Description: One-lane earthen drive to what was the J.
Weikert Farm in 1863 (now the Althoff Farm). Runs north/south
from Wheatfield Road to United States Avenue. The lane is
2020′ long and 20′ wide. After Civil War, lane extended North
to access the Masonheimer Farm and the War Department’s
United States Avenue….

11. Custer Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)

Road Name: Custer Avenue Named For: General George Custer,
commander of brigade of cavalry. Location: East Cavalry
Battlefield. Built: 1908-1915. Altered: Unknown. Designer:
E.B. Cope. Description: Grass lane that possesses crowning,
side slopes &andside drain swales, but the clarity of these
elements is eroding. Crown and slope area 16′ Wx 18 0LF,
total width 60′, total length 215′. History: Part of the War
Department’s overall park plan. A paper road South of Gregg
Avenue built to provide access to monuments at end of avenue,
commemorating Michigan participants in Cavalry Field
engagement….

12. Slyder Lane by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)

Road Name: Slyder Lane (Granite Farm Lane) Named For: John
Slyder, local farmer. Location: Southern end of the
battlefield. Built: 1852. Altered: 1936 (rehabilitation).
Designer: Unknown. Description: Approximately 27′W x 0.318 mi
L, constructed of packed earth & gravel. Provides access to
Granite (Slyder) Farm from Emmitsburg Road to W and to 1st VT
Cavalry monument and D-shaped field as well as woods at base
of Big Round Top to the southeast. A trace portion exists
into the wooded area. History: The current farm lane is
little changed in orientation or composition from the period
of the Battle of…

13. Spangler Farm Lane by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)

Road Name: Spangler Farm Lane Named For: Henry Spangler, the
farmer who owned it. Location: Seminary Ridge. Built: 1820.
Altered: Rehabbed in 2003. Designer: unknown. Description:
0.48 miles Lx25′W. Earthen road leading from Emmittsburg Road
to the Spangler farm house and out buildings from West
Confederate Avenue. Altered in 1976 to 22′W near the house.
The 1868 Warren Map shows a road existed west of the Spangler
House to Willoughby Road. History: The Spangler Lane provided
access to the Spangler farm buildings from the Emmitsburg
Road which were part of Gettysburg Battle of 2nd & 3rd day
fighting. On…

14. Benner’s Hill Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)

Road Name: Benner’s Hill Avenue. Sometimes called Latimer’s
Avenue. Named For: Maj. Joseph W. Latimer was the commander
of Johnson’s Artillery battalion. Location: Benner’s Hill.
Built: 1905. Altered: 1936. Designer: E.B. Cope. Description:
Avenue measures 32′ R/W with 12′ paved area, total length
0.252 mi, including loop at the south end. Replaced dirt and
gravel road that existed during Gettysburg Park Commission
operation. History: Constructed by CCC to provide access to
Benner’s Hill, scene of Latimer’s Battalion and area used by
Confederates as starting point in attack on Culp’s Hill. Road
was originally established by the Gettysburg Park Commission…

15. Ayres Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)

Road Name: Ayres Avenue Named For: Gen. Romeyn B. Ayres,
commander of division in the Fifth Corps. Location: The
Wheatfield. Built: 1906. Altered: Unknown. Designer: E.B.
Cope. Description: 0.303 miles long, 16′ wide, bituminous
treated macadam with telford base. Connects Wheatfield Road
with Sickles Avenue. History: Constructed by War Department
to designate battle lines – here the position held by the
Pennsylvania Reserves and US Regular Infantry. Located West
of Little Round Top at edge of Wheatfield and through Rose
Woods….

16. Granite Schoolhouse Lane by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)

Road Name: Granite Schoolhouse Lane Named For: none.
Location: Southern part of the battlefield. Built: 1800.
Altered: 1934. Designer: Unknown. Description: Approximately
20′W paved roadway, 33′ R.O.W. Surfaced with asphalt; the
original road was earthen. The orientation is the same as in
1863 except the eastern terminus shifted northward about
200′. Total length 0.820 mi. Macadamized by NPS early in the
20th Century. History: Road used by various Union troops
during 3 day battle for troop, equipment and supply movement;
it was only road on major battlefield to connect Baltimore
Pike and Taneytown Road. Orientation is much as it…

17. United States Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)

Road Name: United States Avenue Named For: None. Location:
Second/Third day battlefield. Built: 1895. Altered: 1934.
Designer: E.B. Cope. Description: Avenue was originally 20′
wide with telford-based paving. In the 1930s, avenue was
widened and partially realigned at the Trostle Buildings and
repaved with bituminous asphalt. Currently measures
approximately 36′ wide x 0.781 miles long. It begins at
Emmitsburg Road and ends at Sedgwick/Hancock Avenue. History:
Part of the War Department system of avenues designed and
built to provide access to various areas of Battlefield.
United States Avenue is within area of 3rd day Battle and is…

18. Neill Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)

Road Name: Neill Avenue Named For: Gen. Thomas Neill,
commander of a brigade in the Sixth Corps. Location: Wolf
Hill. Built: 1880-1896. Altered: Unknown. Designer: E.B.
Cope. Description: Sodded avenue located 0.170 mi NE of
Baltimore Pike, S of Rock Creek. Varies in width, 20′ at east
section, 50′ at northwest section. Total 0.309 mi L, approx.
East section in farm, w/ bovines traipsing through road.
Enclosed by stone walls. History: Avenue includes monuments
connected with engagements or troop movements associated with
the 3rd Day Battle and Wolf Hill. Never completed; intended
to ford creek and to connect with…

19. North Confederate Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)

Road Name: North Confederate Avenue (sometimes called Ewell
Avenue) Named For: None. Location: North of town. Built:
1902. Altered: 1935. Designer: E.B. Cope. Description: Avenue
measures 0.356 miles long by 18′ wide. Constructed of
bituminous treated macadam with telford base. Runs from
Buford Avenue and Mummasburg Rd to Doubleday Avenue and
Mummasburg Rd. Alignment was drastically changed to
accommodate the Peace Light Memorial by NPS in 1935-1938.
History: Constructed by War Department to mark position of
Confederate artillery & infantry which attended Federal lines
form Oak Ridge on night of July 1. Shows location of English
Breech loading Whitworth cannons…

20. Pleasonton Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)

Road Name: Pleasonton Avenue Named For: Gen. Alfred
Pleasonton, commander of the Union Cavalry Corps. Location:
Near the Union center. Built: 1896. Altered: 1936. Designer:
E.B. Cope. Description: Originally a 16′ wide telford-based
roadway that was widened and paved with bituminous asphalt in
the 1930s. Currently measures 24′ wide x 0.307 mi. long. This
is a connector road between Taneytown Road at east to Hancock
Avenue at west. History: Part of the War Department system of
avenues designed and built to provide access to various areas
within Battlefield Park. Pleasonton Avenue is within area of
3rd Day Battlefield. Named…

21. Sickles Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)

Road Name: Sickles Avenue Named For: Gen. Daniel Sickles,
commander of the Third Corps. Location: Southern end of the
battlefield, including Devil’s Den and the Wheatfield. Built:
1886. Altered: 1895. Designer: E.B. Cope. Description: Avenue
measures 0.954 miles long by 18′ wide. Constructed of
bituminous treated macadam with telford base. Avenue split
into 2 sections: starts south from Crawford and Warren
Avenues and runs to Wheatfield Road. It then continues west
of the 1st section, from the Wheatfield Road near Peach
Orchard, northward to the Emmitsburg Road. History: Avenue
was constructed by War Department to follow positions of
Sickles’ command…

22. Bushman Farm Lane by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)

Road Name: Bushman Farm Lane Named For: Michael Bushman.
Location: Near Seminary Ridge. Built: 1800 Altered:
Rehabilitated in 2003. Designer: Unknown. Description: Packed
earth and gravel farm lane, about 750′ long, 22′ wide.
Originates at Biesecker Woods and Emmitsburg Road, it leads
east to farm buildings and terminates at Bushman Woods
southwest of Big Round Top. South Confederate Avenue cuts the
southern end into 2 sections. The lane is part of Park horse
trail. History: On July 2, 1863 Hood’s CS Division advanced
across lane to attack the Union left at Devil’s Den & Round
Tops. On July 3, various skirmishes…

23. Sykes Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)

Road Name: Sykes Avenue Named For: Union General George
Sykes, commander of the Fifth Corps. Location: Little Round
Top. Built: 1897. Altered: 1935. Designer: E.B. Cope.
Description: Avenue measures 0.138 miles long by 20′ wide.
Constructed of bituminous treated macadam with telford base.
Altered portion includes 10′ wide by 600′ long dirt covered
asphalt trace from woods S of Ave & ends at intersection of
Sykes & Wheatfield Road. Realigned by NPS in 1935-38.
History: Constructed by War Department to follow positions
defended by 5th Corps under command of General Sykes. Located
on Little Round Top & extends from Wheatfield Road to…

24. Cross, Brooke, and Detrobriand Avenues by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)

Road Name: Cross, Brooke, and DeTrobriand Avenues Named For:
Colonel Edward Cross, commander of brigade in Hancock’s
Corps; Colonel John Brooke, commander of brigade in Hancock’s
Corps; and Colonel Philip DeTrobriand, commander of brigade
in Sickles’ Corps. Location: The Wheatfield. Built: 1906.
Altered: Unknown. Designer: E.B. Cope. Description: Avenues
measure 0.787 miles long by 16′ wide. Constructed of
bituminous treated macadam with telford base. Starting south
in Rose Woods at Sickles and Ayres Avenues and loops back
northwest to Sickles Avenue, at lower end of the Wheatfield.
History: Constructed by the War Department. DeTrobriand
Avenue extends along the stone wall…

25. East Confederate Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)

Road Name: East Confederate Avenue Named For: None. Location:
Culp’s Hill. Built: 1899-1902. Altered: 1934, 1999. Designer:
E.B. Cope. Description: Telford road system originally
measured 20′Wx7241′LF, widened/covered with bituminous
asphalt for motorized vehicles. Now approximately 24′Wx1.308
miles long. Connects Gettysburg Borough and former CS
positions on Middle Street to Slocum Avenue; carriage
turn-around still exists at Spangler’s Spring. History:
Constructed by the War Department to provide access to park
property and monuments associated with Confederate positions
and movements during battle at Culp’s Hill and East Cemetery
Hill. Notes: East Confederate Avenue is closed during…

26. Buford Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)

Road Name: Buford Avenue Named For: Gen. John Buford,
commander of a Union cavalry division. Location: North of
town. Built: 1882. Altered: 1902, 2009 (repaved). Designer:
E.B. Cope. Description: Avenue measures 0.63 miles and is 20′
wide. Constructed of bituminous treated macadam with telford
base. Connects north portion of Reynolds Avenue with
southwest end of North Confederate Avenue at the Mummasburg
Road. History: Constructed by War Department for circulatory
purposes and to mark the position of a portion of Buford’s
command during 1st Day Engagement. Located northwest of
Gettysburg on 1st Day Battlefield….

27. Humphreys Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)

Road Name: Humphreys Avenue Named For: General Andrew A.
Humphreys, commander of Division in Sickles’ Corps. Location:
Cemetery Ridge. Built: 1915. Altered: 1936. Designer: E.B.
Cope. Description: Land was acquired in 1896, but road was
not built until 1915. Road is bituminous asphalt over telford
subbase and measures approximately 36′ wide x 0.097 miles in
length. Includes pull-off area for parking, added in
conjunction with the comfort station construction. History:
Part of the system of roads within Gettysburg Park designed
and built to provide access to various sections of the
Battlefield. Humpherys Avenue is within area of 3rd day…

28. Slocum Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)

Road Name: Slocum Avenue Named For: General Henry Slocum,
commander of the XII Corps. Location: Culp’s Hill. Built:
1884, 1897. Altered: 1934. Designer: E.B. Cope. Description:
Avenue was originally 20′ wide telford-based system, widened,
route altered, and bituminous paved 1930s, approximately 24′
wide x 1.308 mi long. Begins at intersection Colgrove and
East Confederate Avenues and extends to Baltimore Pike near
Steven’s Knoll. Used by vehicles and pedestrians. History:
Slocum Avenue, named after Major General Henry Slocum, weaves
through Culp’s Hill area. It follows much of route laid out
on Culp’s Hill by GBMA and encompasses most of the…

29. West Confederate Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)

Road Name: West Confederate Avenue Named For: none. Location:
Runs along Seminary Ridge. Built: 1894. Altered: 1950-1961.
Designer: E.B. Cope. Description: Avenue measures 2.750 miles
long by 20′ wide. Constructed of bituminous treated macadam
with telford base. Runs in the north/south direction from
Fairfield Road to Emmitsburg Road. The road continues beyond
the Emmitsburg Road, becoming South Confederate Avenue.
History: Section 1, 2, 3, and were constructed by War Dept
through area where Confederate artillery and infantry were
positioned on July 2-3, 1863. West Confederate Avenue is
intersected by the Millerstown Road….

30. Crawford Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)

Road Name: Crawford Avenue Named For: General Samuel W.
Crawford, commander of the Pennsylvania Reserve Division.
Location: The Valley of Death. Built: 1895. Altered: 1980.
Designer: E.B. Cope. Description: Avenue measures 0.345 miles
long by 18′ wide. Constructed of bituminous treated macadam
with telford base. Runs N/S and connects the Wheatfield Road
with Warren Avenue. Cattle guards were added at both ends of
avenue when Little Round Top was converted to pasture use in
1980-1981. History: Constructed by the War Department through
“Valley of Death,” where Crawford’s Pennsylvania Reserve
Division was heavily engaged on July 2, 1863. From…

31. South Confederate Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)

Road Name: South Confederate Avenue Named For: N/A Location:
Built: 1894. Altered: 1930. Designer: E.B. Cope. Description:
Avenue measures 1.793 miles long by 20′ wide. Constructed of
bituminous treated macadam with telford base. Runs from
Emmitsburg Road to Warren and Sykes Avenues. Various
realignments in 1930′s to accommodate automotive traffic,
leaving the road base in place as an archeological site in
several places. History: Constructed by War Department
through area where CS troops advanced to attack Round Tops on
July 2. It crosses breastworks occupied by Law’s CS Brigade
on July 3. It also extends through area where…

32. Reynolds Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)

Road Name: Reynolds Avenue Named For: General John Reynolds,
commander of the Left Wing of the Army of the Potomac.
Location: North west of Town. Built: 1882. Altered: 1897;
1958; 2009 (repaved). Designer: E.B. Cope. Description:
Avenue measures 0.977 miles long by 22′ wide. Constructed of
bituminous treated macadam with telford base. West of
Gettysburg, it extends from Fairfield Road crossing
Chambersburg Pike. It ends at intersection of Buford and
Wadsworth Avenues. The section between US30 and the Wadsworth
statue was altered in the late 1950s. A new bridge was
constructed over the railroad cut in 2009. History:
Constructed by…

33. Hancock Avenue by Jenny at Draw the Sword (and Throw Away the Scabbard)

Road Name: Hancock Avenue Named For: General Winfield Scott
Hancock, commander of the Second Corps. Location: Cemetery
Ridge. Built: 1882. Altered: 1934 and 1961. Designer: E.B.
Cope; road was originally laid out by the GBMA. Description:
Avenue originally constructed of telford-based paving
measuring 25′ wide. Widened & bituminous asphalt paved in
1934 to approximately 36′ wide x 1.237 mi long. Avenue begins
at joining of United States Avenue and Sedgwick Avenue and
loops to Cyclorama Drive. The road was altered with the
construction of the Cyclorama parking lot. History: Part of
the War Department system of avenues designed and built…

34. Thursday, 21 November 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded

I was going to end this section of the post-blog with
yesterday’s post, but who could resist a front page like
this? It’s so emotive and manipulative. The scene itself is
tragic enough: the mass burial and funeral of 172 men, women
and children killed in the blitz on Coventry last Thursday
night. Another seventy will be buried today. But to that the
Daily Mirror adds (1) portentous capitalisation (‘the Tragedy
of Coventry’); (2) a rousing declaration (‘WE SHALL
REMEMBER!’) combined with a graphic of Coventry in flames;
(3) the archaic insults (‘HUNS RAID’, ‘the Hun’s massacre’).
There’s more…

35. Guest Post: Recommission Olympia by Lcdr Claude Berube, Usnr by admin at Other Military History Stuff

In 1883, Moses Gulesian legally emigrated from Armenia to the
United States. Reportedly penniless, his hard work and
ingenuity made him a self-made millionaire. In 1905 when
Secretary of the Navy Charles Bonaparte proposed sinking the
USS Constitution by using her for target practice, Gulesian’s
sense of patriotism for his new country led him to send a
telegram to Bonaparte: “Will give ten thousand dollars for
the Constitution, Old Ironsides. Will you sell?” Although the
offer was refused by the U.S. government, it created the same
groundswell of support for the ship that had once compelled
Oliver Wendell Holmes…

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