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Casey vs. Santorum

October 14, 2006

As the political ads interrupt your favorite television broadcasts,
they send messages either informing you of the
upcoming elections. Between the positive reflection on their own
achievements followed by the many flaws they pull from their
opponents, it becomes very difficult to decipher who is actually
running for which office and for whom you should vote. Currently,
the race for the United States Senate exactly fits that profile. The
public attacks between Rick Santorum and Bob Casey are fairly
recent since November 7th is approaching quickly. These
advertisements seem to be assisting Rick Santorum by lifting his
vote percentage, although Bob Casey still leads by 8%.
To truly appreciate the current standings of the Unites States
Senate race, you need to receive some background to educate
yourself with the history of this race. In March of 2005, the
candidates were just getting thier feet wet and reviewing their
campaign strategies with their managers. Standing at 44% each
with 13% undecided, the candidates had a bit over a year to sway
those votes into their favor.

Moving into the year 2006, the first recorded poll was tallied on
January 15th, where Casey led by 53% to Santorum’s 38%. So
what happened to cause Casey to gain 9% of the vote while leaving
Santorum with 6% less of the vote? Although I have yet to find
concrete evidence to support my theory, I believe that the debates
had begun and the voters used for the polls may have changed their
views on the candidates due to their interpretation of the debated
topics, or some of the undecided voters may have changed. Either
way, Bob Casey did something that Rick Santorum obviously missed
out on.

Three months later in March of 2006, the media began to
choose Bob Casey as the face for Senate. News articles read
headlines such as “Santorum is struggling against Casey”,
and “Casey adds a ‘Santorum Watch’ to website”, especially since
Casey keeps tight ropes surrounding Santorum’s campaign. That is,
until rumors circulated about a third person running for the Senate
seat. Kate Michelman, and abortion rights activist, threatened to run
for office and in doing so, placed quite the pressure on Casey and
Santorum to publicize thier views on abortion. South Dakota, who
bans abortions throught the state, hit the hardest with the issue, but
it still affected Casey’s previous 53%, bringing it down to 48%, while
Santorum remained the same.

Looking even farther ahead, summer was approaching. In June
of 2006, Casey was regaining his ground, although he pretty
much had the lead in the first place. His conservative views on gun
control and abortion had seemingly pleased the voters of
Pennsylvania, while Santorum was concentrating on immigration
laws and attacking Casey. At this point in time, Casey was leading
Santorum by fifteen percentage points, a very great lead for a fast
approaching election day.

Currently, it is October of 2006. All of the elections are
gaining speed and adding more fuel to the fire. As a matter of fact,
there was a scheduled public debtate between Bob Casey and Rick
Santorum on September 27th, to which Bob Casey refused to
attend. How did Santorum handle it? He asked to keep Casey’s
seat at the table, where he insulted his opponent for not attending
the debate. He sarcastically made remarks to an empty chair
making comments that Casey was “ducking” the questions.
However, according to the campaign spokesperson for Bob Casey,
Casey did not feel that the debate was needed, nor did he wish to
speak at a deabte that favors Santorum through financial assistance
towards television ads. In this respect, Casey made the right
move.

As for a projection as to who will win the race at this moment, I
cannot say. Until the one-sided debate, I would’ve agreed that Bob
Casey would win the Senate seat. However, if he couldn’t defend
his advertising and political aspirations while in office during a debate,
I am not sure how the public will view this sort of tactic. It will be
interesting to see what comes out of the media and into the next
poll for the race of United States Senate

Stephanie Bill

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