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Military History Digest #139

December 18, 2010

Table of Contents

1. The H-Bomber Will Always Get Through by Brett Holman at Airminded
2. World War Ii: Pappy Boyington Born by n/a at About.com Military History
3. Navy Ace Bill Davis and the Last Ship by NHHC at Naval History Blog
4. Best of Civil War Publishing – 2010: My Year in Review by noreply@blogger.com (Drew@CWBA) at Civil War Books and Authors
5. December 1, 1921: First Flight of Airship Filled With Helium by Proceedings at Naval History Blog
6. The Cost of War: the Family Perspective: Front &Amp; Center by Pritzker Military Library at Pritzker Military Library Podcasts
7. Exhibit Essay by noreply@blogger.com (Jimmy Price) at Over There
8. Nemesis: Admiral Sir Max Horton and the Defeat of the U-Bootwaffe by Charles McCain at Charles McCain
9. World War Ii Posters by Charles McCain at Charles McCain
10. Review of the Cinderella Service: Raf Coastal Command 1939-1945 by Andrew Hendrie by Charles McCain at Charles McCain
11. A President'S New Orleans Funeral by Charles McCain at Charles McCain
12. Catapult Armed Merchant Ships (Cam Ships) by Charles McCain at Charles McCain
13. World War Ii Posters by Charles McCain at Charles McCain
14. The German Home Front: Always Hungry by Charles McCain at Charles McCain
15. Against Original Research by Brett Holman at Airminded
16. Cross Posting: Tactical Radios – Past, Present, Future by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns
17. Charles R. Swain by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project
18. A Decent Interval: Is It Too Much to Ask? by The Faceless Bureaucrat at Kings of War
19. Joseph Clark Sutton by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project
20. Northern Crusades: Victory on the Ice by n/a at About.com Military History
21. An Estimate of the Number of Surviving Union Soldier Photographs by noreply@blogger.com (Ron Coddington) at Faces of War
22. John H. Sumner by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project
23. 8-Inch Parrott Rifles – Siege of Yorktown by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns
24. Lockheed Hudson – Upper Turret Support Structure Progress by Jamie Croker at Australian War Memorial
25. Maritime Medicine and the Law of the Sea by thomaslsnyder at Of Ships & Surgeons
26. The Forgotten Career of Major Trafford Leigh-Mallory, 1914-1918: a Leadership Perspective by Ross at Thoughts on Military History
27. Ulrich Straus: the Anguish of Surrender by Pritzker Military Library at Pritzker Military Library Podcasts
28. Political Infighter: the Story of Admiral Thomas Hinman Moorer, Usn by NHHC at Naval History Blog
29. World War Ii: B-26 First Flies by n/a at About.com Military History
30. Frozen Chosin by NavyTV at Naval History Blog
31. From Thanh Hoa to Sarajevo: the Odyssey of Admiral Leighton W. Smith by NHHC at Naval History Blog

Contents

1. The H-Bomber Will Always Get Through by Brett Holman at Airminded

Cmnd. 124, Defence: Outline of Future Policy, is one of the
most famous (and infamous) documents in British military
history. It’s better known as the 1957 Defence White Paper,
or the Sandys White Paper after the Minister of Defence
responsible for it, Duncan Sandys. It ended National Service,
committed Britain to nuclear deterrence, and foreshadowed
drastic cuts in conventional force levels. Aviation bore the
brunt of these last. Fighter Command was to be abolished
(though in the end it won a reprieve, at least until 1967)
and a large number of advanced fighter types under
development for the RAF were…

2. World War Ii: Pappy Boyington Born by n/a at About.com Military History

December 4, 1912 – Future Col. Gregory “Pappy” Boyington
(right) is born in Idaho. Attending the University of
Washington, Boyington majored in aeronautical engineering. In
1935, he joined the Marine Corps and began flight training
the following year. Earning his wings, he proved a highly
skilled pilot, but struggled with drinking and discipline
when on the ground. Leaving the USMC in 1941, he joined the
American Volunteer Group (Flying Tigers) in China. Flying
against the Japanese, he claimed six kills (this number is
disputed) before returning the United States in mid-1942.
With World War II raging, he was accepted back…

3. Navy Ace Bill Davis and the Last Ship by NHHC at Naval History Blog

Naval History Blog is pleased to present a guest post by
author Doug Keeney about his friend Bill Davis: In October of
1944, a young Navy lieutenant nosed over his F6F Hellcat and
began a dive towards a Japanese aircraft carrier below. “I
screamed down on the carrier which now completely filled my
gunsights,” the pilot [...]…

4. Best of Civil War Publishing – 2010: My Year in Review by noreply@blogger.com (Drew@CWBA) at Civil War Books and Authors

5. December 1, 1921: First Flight of Airship Filled With Helium by Proceedings at Naval History Blog

Blimp C-7 was piloted by LCDR Ralph F. Wood from Norfolk,
Virginia to Washington, DC during the first flight of an
airship filled with helium on December 1, 1921. The design of
the “C” model was based upon operational experience and was a
decided advance over the “B”. The “C”s were 192 feet long and
42 feet in [...]…

6. The Cost of War: the Family Perspective: Front &Amp; Center by Pritzker Military Library at Pritzker Military Library Podcasts

This program was originally recorded at the Pritzker Military
Library in downtown Chicago and features panelists: Kathleen
and Craig Bennett, Karoline Koehler, and Debbie Kious. Front
& Center with John Callaway: The Cost of War: The Family
Perspective. Originally aired 03/23/2005.

7. Exhibit Essay by noreply@blogger.com (Jimmy Price) at Over There

The following is an essay that I wrote that appeared in the
Henrico County Historical Society’s newsletter:The exhibit
Ready To Do My Part: Henrico County & World War I explores
the events and historical legacies of how American
participation in the First World War directly affected the
citizens of Henrico County.When an assassins bullet claimed
the life of Austrian Arch Duke Franz Ferdinand on June 28,
1914, no one could have foreseen that in three short years 2
million American soldiers would be shipped overseas – or that
116,000 American soldiers would die in the conflict.That
675,000 Americans of all walks of…

8. Nemesis: Admiral Sir Max Horton and the Defeat of the U-Bootwaffe by Charles McCain at Charles McCain

Grand Admiral Karl Dönitz lost the most critical battle of
World War Two: the Battle of the Atlantic. As an admiral he
was second-rate at best, incompetent at worst. As a
strategist and a tactician he was uninformed and tunnel
minded. Morally, he was a weak man of the lowest character.
Why? As one of the top leaders of Nazi Germany, he was well
aware of the foul deeds being committed by the Third Reich
including the cold blooded murder of European Jewry. At
Nuremberg, he perjured himself almost every time he
spoke.+Admiral Sir Max Horton RNToday…

9. World War Ii Posters by Charles McCain at Charles McCain

Other WWII Propaganda Poster postsAnother series of US Home
Front posters. These urge Americans to buy war bonds and
stamps. Like all governments, the United States had to borrow
money to prosecute the Second World War and one of the best
sources of that money were the citizens of the US. Immense
effort was made to entice people into investing their savings
in various types of war bonds both because the country needed
the money and as a way to ‘soak up’ the additional money
people began to make working in war industries. From a nation
with high unemployment and…

10. Review of the Cinderella Service: Raf Coastal Command 1939-1945 by Andrew Hendrie by Charles McCain at Charles McCain

+RAF Coastal Command was the red-headed stepchild of the
British military in World War Two. Its primary function was
patrolling the waters off the coast of the United Kingdom,
providing air cover for convoys, sinking U-Boats, and
attacking German aircraft trying to attack Allied convoys.
This was quite a big job although the Command did not receive
these responsibilities all at once. Because all of their
responsibilities involved coordination with the Royal Navy,
Coastal Command was placed under the tactical command of the
Royal Navy while maintaining its status as part of the RAF.In
terms of priority…

11. A President'S New Orleans Funeral by Charles McCain at Charles McCain

This was one of the first articles I sold to New Orleans
Magazine whom I went on to write half a dozen articles for.
What made this so interesting to me was being able to connect
the history of a past event to the present day. The owner of
the house where the President died even gave me a personal
tour and I was then still a long-haired just graduated Tulane
student. All the other research I was able to do in a private
archive called the Historic New Orleans collection which was
open to researchers. A wealthy oilman…

12. Catapult Armed Merchant Ships (Cam Ships) by Charles McCain at Charles McCain

+The Hawker Sea Hurricane W9182 on the catapult of a CAM
Ship.+An amazing wartime photograph of the cordite rocket
catapult on a CAM ship being fired, propelling the Hurricane
Mk I ‘Hurricat’ into the air at flying speed.In the beginning
years of the war, German aircraft caused so much damage to
Allied convoys that the very unusual expedient of arming
merchant ships with fighter planes was put into practice.
They were designated CAM ships and this was exclusively a
British initiative with only British ships used. This is how
it worked: a merchant ship was fitted with…

13. World War Ii Posters by Charles McCain at Charles McCain

Other WWII Propaganda Poster postsPropaganda posters were
constantly being issued by the OWI (Office of War
Information). These posters in this series are a sample which
focused on the actions being made by the US Navy and the US
Merchant Marine. Poster three points to an effort most
Americans are not familiar with and that is the astounding
expansion of the US Merchant Marine. We built thousands of
ships such as the famous “Liberty ships” of which we built
2,751. These were manufactured in pre-fabricated sections,
shipped by rail to shipyards, and welded together by men and
women hired…

14. The German Home Front: Always Hungry by Charles McCain at Charles McCain

From my novel, An Honorable German:Berlin, January 1943:
…they had to use ration coupons for only the bread and
butter, and for the eggs and sugar that would go into a small
cake for dessert. Max had been issued extra ration coupons
with his leave papers, so Mareth didn’t need to spend any of
hers. The waiter took Max’s large, multi-colored coupon cards
- the orange one for rolls, pink for butter and skim milk,
green for eggs, white for sugar – and cut off the necessary
squares with a pair of scissors. Every waiter in Germany now
carried scissors alongside…

15. Against Original Research by Brett Holman at Airminded

Cross-posted at Cliopatria.] I know. Writing about Wikipedia
is so 2006. And yes, finding errors in Wikipedia articles is
not exactly difficult. But I have a bee in my bonnet which
needs releasing. Wikipedia’s page on the Blitz has a section
entitled ‘Commencement on September 6′. This is how it
currently reads (sans hyperlinks and superscripts): There is
a misconception that the Blitz started on September 7, 1940.
Bombs began dropping the night of September 6 and continued
for the full day of the 7th and on into the morning of the
8th. Saturday 7th was the first full…

16. Cross Posting: Tactical Radios – Past, Present, Future by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns

Over the last few days, I’ve taken a bit of a break from
Civil War topics. A recent news article inspired me to dive
into a subject near and dear to my Army experience – tactical
communications. Not the kind … Continue reading →…

17. Charles R. Swain by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project

Charles R. Swain was born in 1844 in Tioga County, New York,
probably the son of Robert (b. 1821) and Catharine (b.
1824).Charles’s parents were both born in New York and
eventually settled in Tioga County. By 1850 Charles was
attending school with one Julia Lamonte and living with his
family in Barton, Tioga County, New York where his father
worked as a carpenter. Charles left New York with his family,
and came to western Michigan. By 1860 Charles was attending
school with three of his younger siblings, living with his
family in Grand Rapids’ Fourth Ward, Kent County…

18. A Decent Interval: Is It Too Much to Ask? by The Faceless Bureaucrat at Kings of War

A little decency, please. It’s all we ask.

Henry Kissinger will go down in history for many things, but
one of his most interesting contributions is his phrase
‘decent interval’ describing the Nixon Administration’s
desire to have an orderly withdrawal of American forces from
South Vietnam and then some delay before the inevitable
collapse of the Thieu regime. What is perhaps most
interesting about the phrase is the context within which it
was used: Kissinger used it in his discussions with the
Chinese in his secret 1971 trip to Beijing: We are ready to
withdraw all of our forces [from…

19. Joseph Clark Sutton by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project

Joseph Clark Sutton was born in 1836 in Ontario County, New
York.Joseph left New York and by 1863 had settled in western
Michigan.He stood 5’9” with hazel eyes, black hair and a dark
complexion and was a 27-year-old painter possibly living in
Hastings, Barry County when he became a substitute for David
R. Cook who had been drafted on February 10, 1863, for 9
months from Prairieville, Barry County. He was assigned to
Company E, and joined the Regiment on March 10 at Camp
Pitcher, Virginia. According to Andrew Kilpatrick, also of
Company E, Joseph was a Private…

20. Northern Crusades: Victory on the Ice by n/a at About.com Military History

Fought April 5, 1242, the Battle of the Ice saw Russian
forces turn back the Crusaders. Attacking the Russian state
of Novgorod in 1240 Crusader forces were defeated in the
north by Prince Alexander Nevsky at the Battle of the Neva.
Despite this setback, Crusader forces to the south had
success and occupied a number of key towns. Campaigning in
1241 and early 1242, Alexander succeeded in liberating much
of this territory and then raided further west. Completing
his raid, he withdrew east with Crusader forces led by
Hermann, Bishop of Dorpat in pursuit. Crossing the frozen
surface of Lake…

21. An Estimate of the Number of Surviving Union Soldier Photographs by noreply@blogger.com (Ron Coddington) at Faces of War

Is it possible that 4-million original portrait photographs
of Union soldiers have survived a century-and-a-half? That’s
my estimate, and I think it is a fair number — perhaps a bit
conservative.Of course, with any estimate, a few “ifs” are
involved.If 75% of the 2.5-million federal soldiers purchased
one tintype or ambrotype and a set of a dozen cartes de
visite at the beginning of their enlistment, 1.875-million
men would account for 24.375-million photographs.Wow.Now,
take the 1.875-million men, subtract 620,000 war dead
(battles and disease) and you have 1.255-million survivors.
Let’s say each…

22. John H. Sumner by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project

John H. Sumner was born in 1840 in Boston, Massachusetts, the
son of Samuel Robert (b. 1803) and Jerusha (b.
1806).Massachusetts native Samuel married Maine-born Jerusha
in 1831, possibly in Maine where they lived for some years.
By 1850 Samuel was working as a carpenter and John (listed as
“J. H.” ) was attending school with two of his older siblings
in Somerville, Massachusetts. John left Massachusetts and
moved west, eventually settling in western Michigan where by
1859-60 he was living with one Samuel Sumner (probably his
father) on the north side of Lyon east of Prospect Street…

23. 8-Inch Parrott Rifles – Siege of Yorktown by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns

The first combat use of the 8-inch Parrott Rifle came during
the Peninsula Campaign of 1862. When Major General George B.
McClellan encountered Confederate defenses around Yorktown,
he called upon his artillerists and engineers to breach those
lines with a … Continue reading →…

24. Lockheed Hudson – Upper Turret Support Structure Progress by Jamie Croker at Australian War Memorial

The support structure for the upper turret is beginning to
take shape, with repaired and replicated components being
pieced together before installation. This structure is
approximately 1/3 of the way through the fabrication stage.
When complete, the structure will be disassembled, painted,
and then installed into the airframe. Partially completed
upper Turrect support structure Reproduced stowage [...]

25. Maritime Medicine and the Law of the Sea by thomaslsnyder at Of Ships & Surgeons

Before the 20th century, individual navies and trading
companies, to a greater or lesser extent, took responsibility
for providing medical services to sailors in their employ.
Very little seems to have been written in the west about the
obligations of maritime nations with respect to medical care
to enemy combatants or non-combatant personnel on the high
seas until the 1907 Hague Convention added sailors to
protections given to wounded soldiers under previous Geneva
Conventions governing combatant nations. Of the Geneva
Conventions drafted in 1949, the second (“Geneva II”)
provides for the amelioration of the condition of sick,
wounded and…

26. The Forgotten Career of Major Trafford Leigh-Mallory, 1914-1918: a Leadership Perspective by Ross at Thoughts on Military History

[Cross-posted at The Aerodrome] This past Friday I delivered
a paper at a conference on ‘New Research in Military
History’. The conference was organised by the British
Commission for Military History, the History of Warfare Group
at King’s College London and the University of Sussex. It was
a great events and interesting to see lots [...]…

27. Ulrich Straus: the Anguish of Surrender by Pritzker Military Library at Pritzker Military Library Podcasts

Author Ulrich Straus visits the Library to discuss his book:
The Anguish of Surrender: Japanese POWs of World War II.
Originally aired 12/02/04.

28. Political Infighter: the Story of Admiral Thomas Hinman Moorer, Usn by NHHC at Naval History Blog

Thomas Moorer stands out as one of the few senior American
military leaders who fought hard with the political
establishment over the conduct of the Vietnam War. As
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff from July 1970 to July
1970, Moorer constantly pushed for the authority to strike
targets in the Hanoi area with [...]…

29. World War Ii: B-26 First Flies by n/a at About.com Military History

November 25, 1940 – The Martin B-26 Marauder (right) first
flies. Designed by team led by Peyton Magruder, the B-26 was
created in response to a 1939 US Army Air Corps request for a
new medium bomber. Ordered into production straight from the
drawing board, the aircraft entered service in 1941. As the
US Army Air Forces expanded to meet the demands of World War
II, the B-26′s accident rate skyrocketed due to its
abnormally high landing and stall speeds. This led
inexperienced crews to dub the Marauder the “Widowmaker” and
“Martin Murderer.” Though Martin worked to…

30. Frozen Chosin by NavyTV at Naval History Blog

“Chosin,” one of the winners of the 2010 GI Film Festival,
documents the Battle of Chosin Reservoir and its survivors.
In the winter of 1950, 15,000 U.S. troops were surrounded and
trapped by 120,000 Chinese solders in the frozen mountains of
North Korea. Refusing surrender, the men fought 78 miles to
freedom while saving the [...]…

31. From Thanh Hoa to Sarajevo: the Odyssey of Admiral Leighton W. Smith by NHHC at Naval History Blog

When Leighton Warren “Snuffy” Smith was commander of Attack
Squadron 86 on board the carrier America in 1972, an
intelligence officer approached him and suggested he claim a
target he had not hit: “Just put down that you cratered the
approaches to the bridge or something,” he suggested. Smith
replied, “I didn’t crater the approaches; [...]…

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