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Military History Digest #137

December 18, 2010

Table of Contents

1. John T. Strong by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project
2. Chauncey Strickland Jr. by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project
3. Wednesday, 20 November 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded
4. Monday, 18 November 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded
5. Sunday, 17 November 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded
6. A Dominion of the Air by Brett Holman at Airminded
7. World War Ii: Allies Hit Tarawa by n/a at About.com Military History
8. American Revolution: George Rogers Clark Born by n/a at About.com Military History
9. War of 1812: Defeat at Crysler’s Farm by n/a at About.com Military History
10. World Record Flight by Proceedings at Naval History Blog
11. “Paying the Ultimate Price” Corporal Jason Dunham, Usmc by NHHC at Naval History Blog
12. Uss Kirk – (Ff 1087) the Lucky Few by NavyTV at Naval History Blog
13. Guest Post by Liza Schwartz: Remembering Frank Freeland by NHHC at Naval History Blog
14. Congress Allows Arming of Merchant Ships by NHHC at Naval History Blog
15. Albert P. “Scoofer” Coffin and Guadalcanal by NHHC at Naval History Blog
16. Safety First! John Dahlgren and American Naval Ordnance by NHHC at Naval History Blog
17. “I Was Coming Head on at One of Them” Lt. Comdr. William T. Amen by NHHC at Naval History Blog
18. Navy Rips Into Rand by Thomas Rid at Kings of War
19. John J. Stribbling by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project
20. Warren Solomon Stone by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project
21. Hew Strachan: the First World War by Pritzker Military Library at Pritzker Military Library Podcasts
22. The Washington Post Goes Whole Hog on the Sesquicentennial by noreply@blogger.com (dw) at of Battlefields and Bibliophiles
23. Allan M. Laing’s “Carols of a Convict” by George Simmers at Great War Fiction
24. Ira W. Speers by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project
25. 8-Inch Parrott Rifle, Part 2a by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns
26. The P6M Seamaster: Master and Commander of Naught by David Axe at Other Military History Stuff
27. One Hundred Years Ago, 10 November 1910 by UltimaRatioReg at Other Military History Stuff
28. The Battle of Wanat Study by n/a at Other Military History Stuff

Contents

1. John T. Strong by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project

John T. Strong was born on June 17, 1842 in Boston,
Massachusetts, the son of George Furzer (1813-1885) and Mary
(Pulsifier Shea, 1816-1893).George left England and
immigrated to the United States where he met and married
Maine native Mary and settled in Massachusetts sometime
before their oldest child Sarah was born in 1838. By 1850
John was attending school with his older sister Sarah and
living with his family in Andover, Essex County,
Massachusetts where his father worked as a book-binder. His
family moved from Massachusetts sometime after 1850, settling
in Lansing and the Delta Center…

2. Chauncey Strickland Jr. by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project

Chauncey Strickland Jr. was born in 1842 in New York, the son
of Chauncey Sr. (b. 1798) and Mary Ann
(1802-1852).Massachusetts native Chancy Sr. married New
York-born Mary sometime before 1831 by which time they had
settled in New York. By 1850 Chauncey Jr. was attending
school with his five older siblings and living on the family
farm in Royalton, Steuben County, New York. Mary Ann died at
their home in Wayland, Steuben County, New York, in 1852.
Chauncey Sr. eventually moved his family to Michigan and by
1860 he was living with the John Stone family…

3. Wednesday, 20 November 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded

According to the Daily Express, the ‘ever-increasing power
behind Air Marshal Sir Charles Portal’s master-plan for
crippling Hitler’s war industries’ is beginning to yield
results (1). The giant Krupp factory (nearly always rendered
as ‘Krupps’ in the British press) at Essen had three
‘sections […] put out of commission’, which must be
considered especially impressive as it is ‘officially stated’
that they ‘has been built underground because of their
importance’. A big ocean liner, SS Europa, was damaged in an
air raid on the Bremen docks. Other targets attacked recently
include the oil industry at Hanover (‘completely destroyed’)
and…

4. Monday, 18 November 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded

The Daily Mirror likes its headlines big and bold. The one
above takes up two-thirds of the width of today’s front page.
The story is that Arthur Greenwood, Minister without
Portfolio in the War Cabinet (and deputy leader of the Labour
Party; interesting that he is not described as such in an
ostensibly left-wing newspaper) has claimed that Germany is
suffering from aerial bombardment more than Britain — fifty
times more, to be precise (though I’m not sure if that’s just
last week or over the whole war). Partly this is due to ‘The
R.A.F.’s mastery of night…

5. Sunday, 17 November 1940 by Brett Holman at Airminded

I have an embarrassment of Sunday papers now: the Observer,
the Sunday Express, News of the World and The People. The
last named (which has sales of more than 3 million per issue)
has Coventry on the front page, but halfway down and
underneath a photograph of a pig (I couldn’t say why).
US-British cooperation, the brave HMS Jervis Bay and the
Italian evacuation of Koritza in the face of the Greek
advance are the stories which are given top billing instead.

The other three have chosen Coventry as their lead story. The
Sunday Express has this banner headline…

6. A Dominion of the Air by Brett Holman at Airminded

I’ve recently been reading Peter Ewer’s Wounded Eagle: The
Bombing of Darwin and Australia’s Air Defence Scandal, which
I found to be unexpectedly interesting, but not always in a
good way. Wounded Eagle has much less about the Second World
War than I’d thought: much of the early part of the book is
taken up with a detailed analysis of the origins of the
Empire Air Mail Scheme (EAMS) in the 1930s, and then there’s
a long account of the Royal Australian Air Force’s pre-war
procurement policy. There’s a lot of interesting stuff here:
one particular surprise for me…

7. World War Ii: Allies Hit Tarawa by n/a at About.com Military History

November 20-23, 1943 – American forces invade Tarawa (right).
Beginning an “island-hopping” campaign across the Pacific, US
forces moved to strike at Tarawa in the Gilbert Islands.
Attacking on November 20, 1943, US Marines encountered fierce
Japanese resistance and were hampered when many of their
landing craft grounded on the island’s reef. Struggling
ashore after taking heavy losses, the Americans fought for
four bloody days to overcome the Japanese defenders. In the
course of the fighting, nearly the entire 4,690-man Japanese
garrison was killed. American losses were a costly 978 killed
and 2,188 wounded. Causing outrage, the high…

8. American Revolution: George Rogers Clark Born by n/a at About.com Military History

November 19, 1752 – George Rogers Clark (right) is born at
Charlottesville, VA. Trained as a surveyor, Clark spent much
of his time as a young man on the …Read Full Post…

9. War of 1812: Defeat at Crysler’s Farm by n/a at About.com Military History

November 11, 1813 – American forces are beaten at the Battle
of Crysler’s Farm. Advancing down the St. Lawrence River in
the fall of 1813, Maj. Gen. James Wilkinson sought to capture
Montreal. Leading a large force of largely green troops, he
was pursued by a small British force commanded by Lt. Col.
James Morrison. On November 11, Wilkinson instructed forces
under Brig. Gen. James P. Boyd to turn and clear Morrison
from the army’s rear. Assuming a defensive position at
Crysler’s Farm, Morrison received the American assault and
turned it back. With the Americans staggering, he launched a
counterattack which…

10. World Record Flight by Proceedings at Naval History Blog

On November 20th 1933, LCDR Thomas G.W. Settle, USN and MAJ
Chester I. Fordney, USMC set a world record balloon flight
into the stratosphere at 62,237 ft. The Soviet Union had
captured the imagination of the world by sending men higher
than anyone had ever gone before. America’s response was made
shortly afterward by a […]…

11. “Paying the Ultimate Price” Corporal Jason Dunham, Usmc by NHHC at Naval History Blog

Today, the USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109) joins the fleet. Here’s
a little bit of background about her namesake. From the
beginning, it seems fate had destined Jason Dunham to join
the Marine Corps. He was born in Scio, N.Y., on 10 November
1981. That same day, the Corps celebrated its 206th birthday.
Dunham joined […]…

12. Uss Kirk – (Ff 1087) the Lucky Few by NavyTV at Naval History Blog

Now Showing on NavyTV: – the story of the USS Kirk. In late
April and early May of 1975, the destroyer escort USS Kirk
became a haven for refugees fleeing South Vietnam. Kirk‘s
officers and enlisted personnel–trained as warriors–instantly
transformed their man-of-war into a humanitarian assistance
ship. Desperation and anguish gave way to reassurance as
[…]…

13. Guest Post by Liza Schwartz: Remembering Frank Freeland by NHHC at Naval History Blog

It was more than 70 years ago, but Jerry Hoenig clearly
remembers the days he spent as a teenager with his best
friend Frank Freeland. The two Brooklyn boys would go into
Manhattan together to see the old boats at South Ferry and
visit the aquarium. “We used to pal around,” Hoenig recalled,
sitting in […]…

14. Congress Allows Arming of Merchant Ships by NHHC at Naval History Blog

Prior to the official U.S. entry into the Second World War,
American merchant ships carried needed supplies that
supported the Allies in their desperate struggle against the
Axis powers. Although German aircraft and submarines attacked
American merchant ships when they entered war zones, the U.S.
Neutrality Act of 1936 prevented them from being armed, even
[…]…

15. Albert P. “Scoofer” Coffin and Guadalcanal by NHHC at Naval History Blog

On the morning of 14 November 1942, the eleven transports of
Rear Admiral Raizō Tanaka’s Outer South Seas Force
Reinforcement Force were steaming southeast down the “Slot”
toward Guadalcanal. Filled with more than 7,000 Imperial
Japanese Army troops and tons of ammunition and supplies and
escorted by the ships of three destroyer divisions, these
ex-merchantmen […]…

16. Safety First! John Dahlgren and American Naval Ordnance by NHHC at Naval History Blog

November 13, 2010 marks the 201st birthday of Rear Admiral
John A. Dahlgren, known to history as the “father of American
naval ordnance.” Dahlgren, however, almost didn’t make it
past his 40th birthday. On 13 November 1849, he was test
firing a 32-pounder cannon to determine its range when
suddenly the piece exploded, killing a […]…

17. “I Was Coming Head on at One of Them” Lt. Comdr. William T. Amen by NHHC at Naval History Blog

During a fierce battle over North Korea Lt. Comdr. William T.
Amen of VF-111 Sun Downers made the Navy’s first MiG kill, on
9 November 1950. Amen, the Sun Downer’s skipper, led a group
of F9F-2B Panthers flying from Philippine Sea (CV 47) that
covered a strike force of Corsairs and Skyraiders against the
Sinuiju […]…

18. Navy Rips Into Rand by Thomas Rid at Kings of War

It must be so much fun to be a headline writer for, say, The
Sun. Ok, it’s usually not as dramatic as it sounds. But it
helps to get the reader’s attention. Joshua Rovner and Tim
Hoyt, professors at the U.S. Naval War College, have a pithy
review out on a recent RAND study (pdf) on victory in
counterinsurgency. I won’t comment on the study, as I haven’t
read it. But Messrs Rovner’s and Hoyt’s review is a crisp and
clever analysis that pulls no punches. Have a look. (And yes,
of course, opinions are only theirs, not the Navy’s…

19. John J. Stribbling by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project

John J. Stribbling was born on March 15, 1842 in England,
probably the son of William (1818-1899) and Mary Ann (b.
1818).Sometime between 1841 and 1849 William and his family
immigrated to the United States and by 1850 John was living
with his family in Royalton, Niagara County, New York, where
his father was working as a laborer. The family eventually
settled in Michigan. Widower or divorced, William apparently
remarried to one Alvira (1816-1898).John stood 5’10” with
blue eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion and was a
19-year-old farmer possibly living in Delta…

20. Warren Solomon Stone by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project

Warren Solomon Stone was born on January 4, 1846, probably in
Painsville, Lake County, Ohio, the son of Solomon B. (b.
1822) and Henrietta (b. 1817).Ohio natives Solomon and
Henrietta were married probably in Ohio sometime before 1846
and by 1850 were living in Mentor, Lake County, Ohio where
“Solomon W.” attended school. By 1860 “Solomon w.’ was
attending shcool with his younger siblings and living with
his family in Mentor, Lake County, Ohio. Warren probably
moved to Michigan, probably from Ohio, along with his
parents, shortly before the war broke out, settling in Riley,
Clinton County.Warren stood 5’8…

21. Hew Strachan: the First World War by Pritzker Military Library at Pritzker Military Library Podcasts

Author Hew Strachan visits the Library to discuss his book:
The First World War. Originally aired 04/21/05.

22. The Washington Post Goes Whole Hog on the Sesquicentennial by noreply@blogger.com (dw) at of Battlefields and Bibliophiles

23. Allan M. Laing’s “Carols of a Convict” by George Simmers at Great War Fiction

I lived a year in London, But never saw St. Paul’s; All
famous stunts left undone, Nor visited the “Halls.” I lodged
in Royal Quarters, At Majesty’s expense: All round, the walls
of Wormwood Scrubs Were reared for my defence. O, The Palace
at Wormwood Scrubs! The snarling, the sneers and the snubs,
And the long dreary days spent in learning the ways Of the
Palace at Wormwood Scrubs. That is a verse from a poem by
Allan M. Laing, which I first came across in Voices of
Silence, Vivien Noakes’s excellent “Alternative Book of First
World War Poetry”. The…

24. Ira W. Speers by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project

Ira W. Speers was born in 1844 in New York.Ira left New York
and moved west, eventually settling in Michigan where by 1860
he was a farm laborer living with Nathan Mayfield in
Waterford, Oakland County.He was 17 years old and residing in
Pontiac, Oakland County when he enlisted in Company I on May
13, 1861. He was on detached service as a teamster from
November of 1862 through December, with the Brigade wagon
train (probably as a teamster) in January of 1863, and with
the ammunition train from February through September. In
November Ira was detached with an artillery…

25. 8-Inch Parrott Rifle, Part 2a by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns

Harry Smeltzer mentioned this earlier today. Since I was
already discussing the 8-inch Parrott rifles, I will take
advantage of the opportunity to expand upon our Friday
afternoon “discovery.” This 8-inch Parrott case shot was
originally a component of a memorial on the battlefield. The
plastic bag is a standard quart type, roughly 7 to […]…

26. The P6M Seamaster: Master and Commander of Naught by David Axe at Other Military History Stuff

P6M. by STEVE WEINTZ From the late 1940s to the end of the
’50s, the United States Navy sought to define its role in the
new Atomic Age. The Navy’s first attempt at a strategic
nuclear deterrent, 1949′s super-carrier USS United States and
its whiz-bang air wing, was sunk during heated battles
between dissident admirals and Defense Secretary Louis
Johnson. The Navy next turned to its oldest form of aircraft:
the seaplane. The Seaplane Strike Force was a visionary
concept built upon a new generation of jets and turboprops
that could be deployed and supported by tenders…

27. One Hundred Years Ago, 10 November 1910 by UltimaRatioReg at Other Military History Stuff

The United States had not yet entered the Great War on this
135th Birthday of the United States Marine Corps. Commandant
John A. Lejeune would not publish his call for the
celebration of the birthday of our Corps for another eleven
years. Nobody outside of the intimate brotherhood of Marines
knew who John Lejeune was in 1910. Nor did they know Smedley
Butler, or Wendell Neville, nor Thomas Holcomb. John W.
Thomason, Marine Officer and author of the seminal “Fix
Bayonets”, was still in high school in Texas. Most of the
Marine heroes of the Second World War were small…

28. The Battle of Wanat Study by n/a at Other Military History Stuff

The Battle of Wanat Study – 12 November focus at the U.S.
Army’s STAND-TO!

The Battle of Wanat Study

What is it?

The Contemporary History on the battle of Wanat is a study
written by the Combat Studies Institute at Fort Leavenworth,
Kan. The study focuses on the July 13, 2008, battle in
Afghanistan’s Waigal Valley during which nine American
Soldiers died and 27 were wounded defending their small
outpost against a much larger force of insurgents armed with
rocket-propelled grenades and automatic weapons. CSI
conducted an extensive study on the actions that took place
at Wanat in order…

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