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Military History Digest #136

December 18, 2010

Table of Contents

1. 1945 Color Film of the Battleships South Dakota and Nagato by NHHC at Naval History Blog
2. Crusades: Fatimids Surrender Jerusalem by n/a at About.com Military History
3. Dishman: “a Perfect Gibraltar: the Battle for Monterrey, Mexico, 1846″ by noreply@blogger.com (Drew@CWBA) at Civil War Books and Authors
4. Abandoned Wiards by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns
5. John Mccrae: ‘in Flanders Fields’ by noreply@blogger.com (Tim Kendall) at War Poetry
6. Roelof Steffins by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project
7. Ambrose a. Stevens by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project
8. Elisha O. Stevens by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project
9. Joseph Edward Stevens by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project
10. Usn and Usmc in Bolshevik Revolution by NHHC at Naval History Blog
11. American Civil War: Grant Begins at Belmont by n/a at About.com Military History
12. The Longest Winter: the Battle of the Bulge and the Epic Story of World War Ii'S Most Decorated Platoon: Front &Amp; Center by Pritzker Military Library at Pritzker Military Library Podcasts
13. Ocean Views (Secret) by Brett Holman at Airminded
14. Northwest Indian War: St. Clair Routed on the Wabash by n/a at About.com Military History
15. There’s an App for That. . . by noreply@blogger.com (dw) at of Battlefields and Bibliophiles
16. An Alphabet Soup of Confusion: Torpedo Craft in World War Two by Charles McCain at World War II History
17. Reinhart (Ed.): “a German Hurrah! : Civil War Letters of Friedrich Bertsch and Wilhelm Staengel, 9th Ohio Infantry” by noreply@blogger.com (Drew@CWBA) at Civil War Books and Authors
18. November at the Pritzker Military Library by Pritzker Military Library at Pritzker Military Library Podcasts
19. Strategy and the Singularity by David Betz at Kings of War
20. French &Amp; Indian/Seven Years' War: 1758-1759: the Tide Turns by n/a at About.com Military History
21. 8-Inch Parrott Rifle, Part 2 by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns
22. The Continental Congress Commits to a Navy, 30 October 1775 by NHHC at Naval History Blog
23. Why Do So Many Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans Publish Their Memoirs? by The Bunny at Other Military History Stuff

Contents

1. 1945 Color Film of the Battleships South Dakota and Nagato by NHHC at Naval History Blog

The United States takes possession of the Japanese battleship
Nagato at the end of World War II, at Yokusuka Naval Base.
The crew of USS Horace A. Bass (APD-124), moored alongside
Nagato, board the Japanese battleship. In this footage, the
Japanese flag can briefly be seen flying over Nagato, with
Horace A. Bass’s American flag [...]…

2. Crusades: Fatimids Surrender Jerusalem by n/a at About.com Military History

Having taken Antioch in 1098, Crusader forces under Raymond
of Toulouse and Godfrey of Bouillon moved against Jerusalem
the following year. Advancing down the coast, they turned
inland at Jaffa and arrived before the city on June 7. Laying
siege, their initial attacks were defeated by the Fatimid
garrison. Suffering from a shortage of water, they were able
to build siege equipment following the arrival of a Genoese
fleet in late June. After conducting a penitential procession
around the city walls on July 8, the Crusaders made their
final preparations for assaulting the city. Moving forward on
July 13, the…

3. Dishman: “a Perfect Gibraltar: the Battle for Monterrey, Mexico, 1846″ by noreply@blogger.com (Drew@CWBA) at Civil War Books and Authors

4. Abandoned Wiards by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns

I’ve been posting markers from the Stones River battlefield
for the last couple of weeks. One of the war’s largest and
most important engagements, only a portion of the field is
within the National Park boundaries. Even sitting adjacent to
… Continue reading →…

5. John Mccrae: ‘in Flanders Fields’ by noreply@blogger.com (Tim Kendall) at War Poetry

No better time to discuss John McCrae’s ‘In Flanders Fields’
than Remembrance Week, when the poem, or at least a generous
excerpt, will be quoted at countless public events across the
English-speaking world.Rarely has the question been asked:
how appropriate is the poem to an occasion of remembrance? Or
to put it another way, what else might we be submitting to
when we submit to this poem? Lest this seem like a finicky
concern in the context of overwhelming grief, one fact must
be spelt out: in political terms, McCrae could not be more
distanced from Owen and Sassoon…

6. Roelof Steffins by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project

Roelof Steffins was born on June 28, 1837, in the
Netherlands, the son of Hendrick (b. 1795) and Maatje (b.
1795).Roelof’s family immigrated to America and evnetually
settled in western Michigan where by 1860 Roelof was working
as a lumberman and living with his parents in Blendon, Ottawa
County.Roelof, known also as “Ralph,” stood 6’0” with blue
eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was 23 years old
and probably still living in Blendon when he enlisted in
Company F on May 13, 1861. He was absent sick in the hospital
in August of 1862, but eventually recovered…

7. Ambrose a. Stevens by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project

Ambrose A. Stevens was born on September 20, 1829, in
Rutland, Jefferson County, New York, the son of Alexander (b.
1799) and Lydia (Peck).Ambrose’s parents were married in 1820
in Jefferson County, New York.Ambrose may have served in the
army during the Mexican War. In any case, he eventually
settled in Watertown, Jefferson County, New York where he
married New York native Marion C. Frazell (1833-1900) on
November 10, 1853, in Watertown, and they had at least one
son, William (or Wallace F., b. 1873). Ambrose was reportedly
“educated for a mercantile profession in New York City,” and…

8. Elisha O. Stevens by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project

Elisha O. Stevens was born on March 23, 1828, in Vermont, the
son of Truman and Lucy (Bryant).In 1840 Truman was living in
Pawlet, Rutland County, Vermont, and by 1850 Lucy was
recorded as living in Pittsford, Rutland County, Vermont (it
is unclear what became of Truman). In 1850 there was a farmer
by the name of Elisha Stevens, age 23, born in Vermont,
living in Montgomery, Franklin County Vermont, and living
with him were two small children, Sarah, 2 years old (and
born in New Hampshire), and Alva, 5 months old.Elisha was
married to New York native Joanna…

9. Joseph Edward Stevens by Steve Soper at Third Michigan Infantry Research Project

Joseph Edward Stevens was born on July 4, 1836, in Campbell,
Steuben County, New York, the son of Ralph (1811-1901) and
Jane (Miller, b. 1812).Joseph’s parents were married in 1834,
possibly in New York. In any case by 1836 they were living in
Steuben County, New York. Joseph eventually left New York and
moved west, settlingin Michigan by the time he Michigan
native Jane Eliza Bartlett (1840-1903), on March 24, 1858;
they had at least five children: Edward Corwin (b. 1859),
Brainard Wyman (b. 1863), Rufus W. (b. 1865), John Bartlett
(b. 1874) and Estelle Phylora (b…

10. Usn and Usmc in Bolshevik Revolution by NHHC at Naval History Blog

The Bolshevik seizure of power following the 1917 October
Revolution plunged Russia into a protracted and bloody civil
war. The Civil War’s destabilizing affects led to an
international intervention. Among this international group
were Great Britain, France, Japan, China, and the United
States. Between 1918 and 1920, the allied powers deployed
military expeditions to major [...]…

11. American Civil War: Grant Begins at Belmont by n/a at About.com Military History

Novmber 7, 1861 – Brig. Gen. Ulysses Grant (right) fights the
Battle of Belmont. Moving south down the Mississippi River,
Grant sought to raid the Confederate garrison at Belmont, MO,
opposite from the formidable batteries at Columbus, KY.
Landing on the morning of November 7, Grant’s men succeeded
in driving back Confederate forces led by Brig. Gen. Gideon
Pillow. Having captured Camp Johnston at Belmont, Union
forces fell to plundering the Confederate base. Grant, aware
that enemy reinforcements were crossing the river, succeeded
in restoring control and began retreating north to his
transports. Meeting the enemy en route, Union forces were…

12. The Longest Winter: the Battle of the Bulge and the Epic Story of World War Ii'S Most Decorated Platoon: Front &Amp; Center by Pritzker Military Library at Pritzker Military Library Podcasts

Author Alex Kershaw visits the library to discuss his book
The Longest Winter: The Battle of the Bulge and the Epic
Story of World War II’s Most Decorated Platoon. Front &
Center with John Callaway. Originally aired 2/9/2005.

13. Ocean Views (Secret) by Brett Holman at Airminded

Someone on the WWI-L mailing list posted a link to a scanned
book with the rather excellent title Photographs of H.M.
Vessels & Auxiliaries and Other Objects Taken from the Air.
This was printed in August 1918 for the Intelligence
Department of the Admiralty as CB 848 and was very clearly
marked secret, issued in numbered copies so that if it fell
into the wrong hands the security breach could be traced.
There is also the rather odd restriction that This book is
NEVER to be carried in any Aircraft heavier or lighter than
air. Presumably this again was to…

14. Northwest Indian War: St. Clair Routed on the Wabash by n/a at About.com Military History

November 4, 1791 – Maj. Gen. Arthur St. Clair’s (right) small
army is routed at the Battle of the Wabash. In the wake of
early American defeats during the Northwest Indian War, St.
Clair was tasked with forming a large expedition to attack
the Miami capital at Kekionga. Poorly supplied and consisting
of ill-disciplined and untrained men, St. Clair’s army of
around 2,000 men departed Ft. Washington (Cincinnati) in
October 1791. Slowly moving north, he soon lost half his men
to desertion. Camping at the headwaters of the Wabash River
on November 3, St. Clair failed to fortify his camp…

15. There’s an App for That. . . by noreply@blogger.com (dw) at of Battlefields and Bibliophiles

This looks pretty cool. Certainly the price is right (.99
cents). Civil War Preservation Trust has released its first
virtual battlefield guide, with ready access to “orders of
battle, battle facts, historical photos, troop positions,
chronologies,” battle maps, and video clips of historians
holding forth. Not to mention GPS to tell you exactly where
you are on the battlefield. The potential for this kind of
App is really exciting. Imagine pulling up one of CWPT’s
beautiful maps, locating yourself on that map, and then
reading some after-action reports referring to the spot where
you’re standing. At present, only part…

16. An Alphabet Soup of Confusion: Torpedo Craft in World War Two by Charles McCain at World War II History

Crossposted from CharlesMcCain.com] PT Boats, MTBs, E-Boats,
S-Boots, Torpedo boats all blend together as generic terms
for some type of small, fast torpedo craft. US Navy Patrol
Torpedo boats were only deployed in the Pacific and never
used in the European Theater of Operations but the image of
the PT boat often sticks in our minds as the image of any
other fast torpedo craft.

USS PT-105 running at high speed, during exercises off the
U.S. East Coast with other units of Motor Torpedo Boat
Squadron Five, 12 July 1942

In the decades prior to the First…

17. Reinhart (Ed.): “a German Hurrah! : Civil War Letters of Friedrich Bertsch and Wilhelm Staengel, 9th Ohio Infantry” by noreply@blogger.com (Drew@CWBA) at Civil War Books and Authors

18. November at the Pritzker Military Library by Pritzker Military Library at Pritzker Military Library Podcasts

Hear what will be offered at the Pritzker Military Library
this November

19. Strategy and the Singularity by David Betz at Kings of War

I see that the Royal United Services Institute has published
the results of a survey of its members’ views on the
Strategic Defence and Security Review. The headline finding:
SDSR was a lost opportunity. For what it’s worth, I seem to
have voted with the majority on all points except on whether
the ‘opportunity’ for deepening UK-France defence cooperation
was welcome or not. But to be honest I can’t summon much
interest in debating the specific points of the review. The
whole thing looks like a
rearranging-the-deck-chairs-on-the-Titanic exercise which
seems to have inspired…

20. French &Amp; Indian/Seven Years' War: 1758-1759: the Tide Turns by n/a at About.com Military History

Regrouping in North America, the British succeeded in
capturing Louisbourg and Fort Duquesne in 1758, but suffered
a bloody repulse at Fort Carillon. The following year British
troops won the key Battle of Quebec (right) and secured the
city. In Europe, Frederick invaded Moravia but was forced to
withdraw after a defeat at Domstadtl. Switching to the
defensive, he spent the remainder of that year and the next
in a series of battles with the Austrians and Russians. In
Hanover, the Duke of Brunswick had success against the French
and later defeated them at Minden. In 1759, the French had…

21. 8-Inch Parrott Rifle, Part 2 by Craig Swain at To the Sound of the Guns

Earlier I introduced the 8-inch Parrott rifle and discussed
the design and production particulars. Time to look at the
functional and operational aspects of the weapon. The 8-inch
Parrotts used projectiles designed by Robert Parrott, of
course, along with those … Continue reading →…

22. The Continental Congress Commits to a Navy, 30 October 1775 by NHHC at Naval History Blog

On 13 October 1775, the Continental Congress voted to
purchase, arm, and fit out two warships for the purpose of
capturing enemy transports “laden with warlike stores and
other supplies.” It was a momentous decision by the
lawmakers, one that prompted Massachusetts delegate and naval
advocate John Adams to crow, “We begin to feel a [...]…

23. Why Do So Many Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans Publish Their Memoirs? by The Bunny at Other Military History Stuff

Last night at the Navy Memorial in Washington, D.C., a panel
discussion was taped for broadcast on The Pentagon Channel on
Veterans Day. Hosted by Fox News Channel’s Bret Baier, the
symposium served as the kickoff event for the American
Veterans Center’s annual two-day veterans’ conference. The
panel featured several young veterans who were wounded in
Iraq and Afghanistan. They talked candidly to a packed
audience about how they were wounded, how they recovered and
how they are moving on with the next chapter of their lives.
Unlike many former generations of veterans, this cadre of
combat wounded seems…

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